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Parking
Parking

Parking-related requirements in your city's zoning code shape how your city is built more than any other line of code. That's because most cities across the country have parking minimum requirements in their code—forcing developers to construct a certain number of parking spots based on the size and use of the development. 

The result: huge, empty lots of unused, financially unproductive space. (Don't believe us? Just check out our annual Black Friday Parking event.)

This page is dedicated to all conversations related to parking. Consider starting with one of the following: 

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Discussion
Parking Forum

Lot too small for parking requirements.

We have a lot in our historic district that won't provide adequate parking per the zoning regulations. What are some realistic solutions to this?

Rodney RutherfordStrong Towns Member
Professional systems engineer. Community liveability evangelist. Armchair sustainability economist.

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The Parking Reform Network

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Discussion
Zoning Stories

We forbid what we value most.

If our historic downtowns had to follow present-day parking minimum laws, they would never be built.

Read the post: https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2017/11/20/we-forbid-what-we-value-most